This site uses cookies in order to function as expected. By continuing, you are agreeing to our cookie policy.
Agree and close

Bioloģiskā daudzveidība Latvijā lapas karte

This page lists the links published in this portal, alphabetically ordered by title. You can also sort the items by URL or group them by server.

Links that appear in: [ URL objects] [ other types of objects: news, stories, events]

Links from URL objects

  • Latvijas Biotopu klasifikators LATVIAN HABITATS CLASSIFIER
    Authors: I.Kabucis (red.), Dr.B.Bambe, L.Engele, S.Jermacane, B.Laime, Dr.M.Pakalne, J.Smalinskis, A.Urtans
    2001

    A. SEA HABITATS

    Habitats occurring in the coastal waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga.

    A.1. Sea bottom without vegetation
    Benthic habitats occurring in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established. Species composition depends mainly on the depth and physical properties of the bottom.

    A.1.1. Sandy sea ground
    Benthic sea habitats on a sandy ground in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.1.2. Muddy sea ground
    Benthic sea habitats on muddy or soft clay in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.1.3. Dolomitised sea ground
    Benthic sea habitats on dolomite in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.1.4. Sandstone sea ground
    Benthic sea habitats on sandstone ground in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.1.5. Boulder ground in the sea
    Benthic sea habitats on the stony ground in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.1.6. Pebble sea ground (bottom)
    Benthic sea habitats on pebble ground in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.1.7. Sea ground covered by shells
    Benthic sea habitats with mollusc shells or its fragments in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths have not established.

    A.2. Sea bottom covered by aquatic plants

    A.2.1. Growths with Zostera marina
    Benthic sea habitats in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths are formed by Zostera marina or it dominates.

    A.2.2. Growths with Fucus
    Benthic sea habitats in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths are formed mainly by brown algae Fucus.

    A.2.3. Growths with red algae in the sea
    Benthic sea habitats in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths are formed mainly by various red algae species.

    A.2.4. Growths with green algae in the sea
    Benthic sea habitats in the waters of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga in places where macrophyte growths are formed mainly by various green algae species.

    A.3. Open warter (pelagial) in the sea
    Open water in the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga where the species composition of pelagic communities depends from the depth, water temperature and salinity.

    A. 4. Coastal bars
    Shallow water places and coastal underwater ridges in the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga on which depending from the substrate different plant communities appear. On the steep margins of the bars in different depth other communities develop and a peculiar vertical zonation is observed. On bars macrophyte growths can develop or they may not be covered with macrophytes. Most often bars are complexes of microhabitats or even different habitats.

    A.4.1. Sand bars in the sea
    Sand bars develops in shallow places in the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga as well as underwater coastal ridges.

    A.4.2. Pebble bars in the sea
    Shallow places and coastal underwater bars in the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga formed by pebble material.

    A.4.3. Boulder bars in the sea
    Underwater boulder assemblages in the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga that in the periods of low water level can be partly open.

    A.5. Coastal lagoons
    Shallow, slightly salty water basins that are partly or completed separated by sandy bars or dunes from the sea.

    A.5.1. Open water in the coastal lagoons
    Open water in the coastal lagoons where macrophyte cover has not developed. Common in new lagoons as well as in the deepest places of the oldest lagoons.

    A.5.2. Submerged aquatic plant growths in lagoons
    Plant communities with submerged aquatic plants (eloids ) as Zannichelia palustris, Ruppia maritima and Batrachium baudotii characteristic for slightly salty waters.

    A.5.3. Above water plant cover in lagoons
    Plant communities formed by above water plant (helophyte) species.

    A.6. Large river mouths
    River mouths with slightly salty water and submerged to wind floods. Communities are characterised by fresh water and slightly halophytic plant species

    B. COASTAL HABITATS

    B. 1. BEACHES
    Beach is a part of terrestrial land that starts from the seawater minimum level and ends with the maximum (during storms) and is directly subjected to regular influence of coastal streams, waves and wind. Beach is a coastal formation that marks the coastline and commonly is formed by easily washed sediments (sand‚ gravel‚ pebbles) and cockleshells. Beach is often called as seashore - area that is flooded.

    B. 1. 1. Sandy beaches
    Sandy beach is formed by sand that can be fine‚ medium rough and rough. Total length of sandy beaches in Latvia reaches about 240 km.

    B. 1. 1.1.Dry‚ high beaches
    B.1.1.1.1.1. Dry‚ high beaches without vegetation
    Dry beaches where that all the vegetation season, also at the end of summer and in autumn are not covered by vegetation.
    B.1.1.1. 2. Dry‚ high beaches with sparse, mainly annual plant cover
    Beach where plants form a sparse plant cover and grow scattered one by one‚ as well as in groups or continuous vegetation develops. Such vegetation is characteristic at the end of summer and in autumn. On dry beaches plant species of slightly salty habitats - halophytes dominate.
    Typical plant species: Salsola kali‚ Cakile baltica‚ Atriplex littoralis‚ Honckenya peploides.
    Rare plant species: Atriplex glabriuscula‚ A. longipes‚ Corispermum intermedium‚ Chenopodium acerifolium.

    B.1.1.2. Low, moist sandy beaches
    Beaches that permanently or periodically are moist and where pools are often observed.
    B.1.1.2.1. Low, moist, sandy beaches without vegetation
    Moist beaches that all the vegetation season, also at the end of summer and in autumn are not covered by vegetation.
    B.1.1.2.2. Low, moist, sandy beaches with vegetation
    Low beaches commonly are characterised by a dense plant cover that mainly consists of hydrophylous plant species. Quite often vegetation zonation is observed beach micro-relief and other factors determine that.
    Typical plant species: Ranunculus sceleratus‚ Bidens tripartita‚ Polygonum mite‚ Rorippa palustris‚ Polygonum hydropiper‚ Juncus bufonius.
    Rare plant species: Juncus balticus‚ Aster tripolium‚ Atriplex calotheca.
    B.1.1. 2.3. Low, moist, sandy beaches with springs
    Low beaches where spring waters flush out. Such beaches are very narrow and border with the ancient coastline. In some places vegetation characteristic for moist beaches develops.
    B.1.1. 3. Beaches with peat
    Beach where peat is covered by sand. Such beach has developed at the seacoast near Nida Mire. Plant cover is formed by beach and dune plants, as well as hydrophylous plant species.

    B.1.2. Gravel and pebble beaches
    Beaches that mainly consist of gravel or pebbles. Often the material forming this beach is mixed, for example, has gravel and pebbles, like gravel-pebbles beaches and sandy-gravel beaches. Most of the beaches of this group are periodically varying.

    B.1.2.1. Gravel and pebble beaches without vegetation
    Gravel and pebble beaches that all the vegetation season also at the end of summer and in autumn is not covered by vegetation. Characteristic mainly for pebble beaches.
    B.1.2.2. Gravel and pebble beaches with vegetation
    Gravel and pebble beaches with a plant cover that most often is sparse. Plants grow mostly scattered, one by one or in-groups, sometimes a continuous plant cover establishes.
    Typical plant species: Honckenya peploides‚ Cakile baltica‚ Atriplex species, Salsola kali.

    B.1.3. Boulder beaches
    Beaches with many boulders.

    B.1.3.1. Boulder beaches without vegetation
    Boulder beach that all the vegetation season, also at the end of summer and in autumn is not covered by vegetation.
    B.1.3.2. Boulder beaches with vegetation
    Boulder beaches where various plant communities develop.
    B.1.3.2.1. Boulder beach with tall vegetation
    In low and moist beaches between the boulder vegetation that consists of vascular plant species growing near the coast appears. In some places beach vegetation leads to wetland vegetation characteristic for the shallow water zone.
    Typical plant species: Phragmites australis‚ Scirpus tabernaemontani‚ Bolboschoenus maritimus‚ Typha angustifolia.
    B.1.3.2.2. Boulder beaches with low vegetation
    Low vegetation is more characteristic for high beaches. It is formed mostly by Honckenya peploides‚ in some places also Carex arenaria and other plant species.

    B. 2. DUNES
    Dunes are wind blown sandy bars. Dunes develop in those places where is enough sand‚ low ground water level‚ constant governing winds and sparse plant cover. Most often and faster dunes develop if there is a barrier in the way of wind moved sand - plants and branches.

    B.2.1. Primary dunes
    Primary dunes are dunes located most closely to the sea and at the seaside border with the beach. Primary dune development directly depends from the amount of sand on the beach. In Latvia the total length of primary dunes reaches about 240 km.

    B.2.1.1. Embryonic dunes
    Embryonic dunes are the first stage of dune development. These are small, about 10-50 cm high sandy bars with sparse vegetation.
    Typical plant species: Leymus arenarius‚ Honckenya peploides‚ xCalammophila baltica‚ Elytrigia x littorea.
    Rare plant species: Elytrigia junceiformis‚ Linaria loeselii‚ Crambe maritima.
    B.2.1.2. Foredunes
    Foredunes or white dunes are dunes develop after the embryonic dunes where still active sand blowing takes place. Foredunes can be with sparse or scattered plant cover that is formed by species of sandy habitats or may be without vegetation.
    B.2.1.2.1. Foredunes characterised by the dominance of vascular plants
    Foredunes where vascular plants, mainly grasses dominate.
    Typical plant species: Ammophila arenaria‚ Calamagrostis epigeios‚ Leymus arenarius‚ Festuca arenaria‚ Hieracium umbellatum‚ Artemisia campestris.
    Rare plant species: Eryngium maritimum‚ Lathyrus maritimus‚ Linaria loeselii‚ Tragopogon heterospermus.
    B.2.1.2.2. Foredunes with shrubs
    Foredunes where many shrub species are characteristic, mainly willows. They can be planted or self-established.
    Typical plant species: Salix daphnoides‚ S. viminalis‚ S. rosmarinifolia.
    Rare plant species: Salix repens‚ Lonicera caerulea var. pallasii.

    B.2.2. Secondary dunes
    Secondary dunes are dunes that develop after primary dunes. On secondary dunes vegetation of grey dunes, forest or grasslands can be observed.

    B.2.2.1. Grey dunes
    Grey dunes are relatively stable dunes and plant cover consists mainly of bryophytes‚ lichens and low perennial plant species as well as separate trees and shrubs.
    B.2.2.1.1. Grey dunes with low vascular plant vegetation
    Grey dunes vegetation consists mainly of bryophytes, lichens and low perennial plants.
    Typical plant species: Koeleria glauca‚ Carex arenaria‚ Thymus serpyllum‚ Pulsatilla pratensis, as well as bryophytes, like Racomitrium canescens and Tortula ruralis
    Rare plant species: Alyssum gmelinii‚ Dianthus arenarius‚ Silene borysthenica.
    B.2.2.1.2. Grey dunes with shrubs and trees
    Dunes with separate trees‚ shrubs or their groups. In some places groups of dwarf shrubs develop.
    Typical plant species: Juniperus communis‚ Pinus sylvestris‚ Salix daphnoides.
    Rare plant species: Lonicera caerulea var. pallasii‚ Salix repens.

    B.3. Dune slacks
    Dune slacks develop in relief depressions between dunes in places with a higher ground water level. Characteristic in such places where are several foredunes occur. Commonly dune slacks are narrow and change fast due to overgrowing by trees or land paludification.

    B.3.1. Dune slacks with pioneer vegetation
    Periodically moist depressions with scarce or continuous plant cover that is formed by pioneer species.
    Typical plant species: Sagina nodosa‚ Equisetum variegatum‚ Carex flacca.
    Rare plant species: Centaurium littorale‚ Juncus balticus.
    B.3.2. Dune slacks with grassland vegetation
    Depressions that are observed in a transition zone between foredunes and grey dunes and shrub zone or forest. In the plant cover grassland species dominate.
    Typical plant species: Rhinanthus vernalis‚ Poa pratensis‚ Anthoxanthum odoratum‚ Ranunculus acris.
    Rare plant species: Dactylorhiza incarnata‚ D. baltica‚ Epipactis palustris.
    B.3.3. Dune slacks with calcareous fen vegetation
    Depressions where calcareous fen species are characteristic. Peat layer is lacking or may be very shallow.
    Typical plant species: Carex flacca‚ Potentilla erecta‚ Molinia caerulea‚ Galium boreale.
    Rare plant species: Schoenus ferrugineus‚ Cladium mariscus‚ Primula farinosa

    B.4. BLUFFS
    Bluffs are seacoasts that have developed under the influence of wash-off or abrasion. Bluffs can change periodically both under the influence of natural and anthropogenic factors. Two types of wash-off coasts can be distinguished where the wash-off dominates over the sand accumulations and coasts where wash off has stopped and that partly or totally are covered by vegetation. Different substrate can form the wash off coasts.

    B.4.1. Bluffs with moraine outcrops
    B.4.2. Sand-clay bluffs with springs
    B.4.3. Sandy bluffs
    B.4.4. Gravel-pebble bluffs
    B.4.5. Sandy bluffs with peat
    B.4. 6. Sandstone outcrops near the coast

    B.5. Coastal pools

    B.5.1.Constant coastal pools
    Water basins in the zone of fore dunes or grey dunes with permanent brackish water.
    Typical plant species: Bolboschoenus maritimus‚ Typha angustifolia‚ Sparganium species.
    Rare plant species: Juncus balticus.
    B.5.2. Drying out pools
    Periodically drying out slightly salty water pools in the beach or dune slacks. More important are annual amphibic plants

    B.6. GROWTHS OF TALL VASCULAR PLANTS IN THE COASTAL WETLANDS
    Coastal wetlands with the growths of tall vascular plants occur in the seacoast shallow water zone. In Latvia can be observed near the Gulf of Riga.

    B.6. 1. Coastal Phragmites growths
    Phragmites growths in the shallow waters of the sea coast. Typical plant species: Phragmites australis‚ Sium latifolium‚ Scirpus tabernaemontani.
    B.6.2. Scirpus growths in the coastal wetlands
    Growths with Scirpus in the shallow waters of the sea coast where Scirpus tabernaemontani dominates.
    B.6.3. Bolboschoenus maritimus growths in the coastal wetlands
    Growths with Bolboschoenus maritimus in the shallow waters of the sea coast.
    Typical plant species: Bolboschoenus maritimus‚ Scirpus tabernaemontani



    http://piekraste.daba.lv/LV/biotopi/biotopu_klasifikators_iss_20050113.shtml
  • Latvijas abinieku un rāpuļu saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=raapinieki
  • Latvijas bezmugurkaulnieku sugu saraksts
    http://leb.daba.lv/listt.htm
  • Latvijas gliemeņu sugu saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=gliemenes
  • Latvijas gliemežu sugu saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=gliemezi
  • Latvijas putni
    http://www.putni.lv/
  • Latvijas sūnu saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=suunas
  • Latvijas zivju saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=zivis
  • Latvijas zīdītāju saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=ziidiitaaji
  • Latvijas ķērpju saraksts
    http://latvijas.daba.lv/scripts/db/saraksti/saraksti.cgi?d=keerpji
  • Sugu enciklopēdija "Latvijas Daba"
    http://www.latvijasdaba.lv/
  • Sēņu latviskie nosaukumi
    http://miko.ldm.gov.lv/Senu_latviskie_nosaukumi.htm
  • Vides monitoringu atskaites no 1991. - 2004. gadam
    http://www.lva.gov.lv/monitor/darbi.htm

URLs that appear in other types of objects: news, stories, events